What do throwing up and a soccer coach have in common?

Bear with me, you will see the connection with these stories, and it applies to all of us young folk

Story time brought to you by The Bean: Roofie Coolatas on us

Part 1

In middle school and elementary school no one wants to be the kid who throws up in homeroom. Or gym class. Or lunch. In high school if you throw up you get labeled the belemic kid. Throw up in college and you either get A) an ambulance to transport you or B) an opportunity to rally. So for the most part, throwing up in school sucks. Naturally, I threw up in 7th grade. Lets backtrack a little. In 6th grade I got rushed to the nurse’s room because I ate a Lima bean and had an allergic reaction to it, of course. So it was only right I follow up my 6th grade year by throwing up in 7th grade. And this one came out of no where. Normally you get the pre-vomit weird feeling in your throat (grandparents pronounce throat [trote] by the way.) I didn’t even get that. I just booked it out of class and did the fastest speed walk ever to the nurse’s room. I made it to the door but not the bathroom. In retrospect, I probably should have just went to the boy’s bathroom like hmmm…I don’t know….every other person would have done. But anyways, I made it just only the door. The throw up started to come out and I saw my target: the world tiniest trash can. Lets just say my aim was subpar that day. About half made it in, half hit the tile. And what did the lovely nurse say? “At least he tried.” Nah I appreciate it nurse, thanks for the inspirational words. I was temporarily the laughing stock of the prepubescent world and that’s all you had to say? huh

Part 2

When I was a sophomore in high school I went to this awesome soccer camp in some remote place in Connecticut. I wanted to get really good and play college soccer. So your boy had to put in the work. My soccer coach for the week was a hardo. I mean he was more hardo than Peanut when he proclaimed he had the best core out of anyone on spring break. I’m talkin more hardo than Leo when he had 4 hot dogs for breakfast before work. More hardo than that blond dude who slaughtered the rap battle in the Bahamas. This dude was always on my case and one day he made us do this impossible drill. I was supposed to run from one goal post to the other and deflect a ball that he threw into the net. But the dude would purposely throw the ball 10 seconds before I could get to it. At first I just stood there with my hands on my head. What was the point of trying if I could never save the ball. My coach saw my frustration and said, “You have to try. No matter what, no matter how impossible something seems, you at least have to give yourself the chance to be successful.” So I kept doing the impossible drill. I never saved one ball but I dove every time and tried harder than anyone else.

Lesson: Just try. No matter how hard something is, just try.

You have to realize the importance of giving effort. Most people see what they want and get too intimidated to even attempt to get it. You will fail more times than you succeed but, that is the most encouraging sign a person can see. There are two types of failure:

1) Failure because you never even tried       or        

2) Failure because you weren’t good enough

You always want to failure because of reason number 2. That means you tried to get something good for yourself that was out of you league. You strove for something great and fell short. You attempted to make your life better. Not only is that noble, but it is an outline of how to grow.

Pick a goal. Train for it. Fail. Learn. Try again

But always, always, try... “For failure isn’t a mark of incompetence, it is a permanent reminder that you attempted to obtain something more, something better, something great. A reminder you tried, a mark of courage and strength. And where there is courage, there is the ability to try again until successful.”

For my college friends, keep trying and do not let denied jobs slow you down. Have faith and courage.Most of all try.Give yourself the opportunity to be sucessful.

Yours,                                                                                                                                                                     PHA

 

Reflection

It seems like just yesterday I transferred to the best college ever. Yeah, time really went by fast over on Thompson Ave…and New Res, then New Res again. I’m going to be leaving the people I love. I’m going to be leaving a place I called home for the last 3 years. I have no job lined up. I have no idea what I want to do in life. 

Scary part over:

Time goes by too fast. That’s just a fact. So here’s what I do to make things slow down and  make sure I don’t take one minute for granted. By the way, the goal isn’t to make the fun last as long as it can. The goal is to realize when everything in your life is perfect.

Things I do to make everything slow down:

1. Every night I think of things I’m thankful for

That may seem stupid but I guarantee you will go to bed smiling. Which consequently guarantees you will wake up smiling. Its a good way to stay grounded, try it out.

2. Every night I text my mom goodnight and tell her I love her

This too may seem insignificant. But it lets me know that I have someone somewhere that is responsible for the good times I am able to have. Its my way of telling her I love her and not a day passes where I don’t think about how much she sacrificed for me to be where I am at

3. Every Friday (weather permitting) I take the seashell path back to my car after I’m out of class

This gives me 15 minutes where I have absolutely nothing to worry about. I put on whatever jam I’m feeling that day and take in the view. And if the song is hot, I may even do a version of the Espy 2-Step while i’m swagwalking. For these 15 minutes, it is impossible for me to be stressed.

4. Once a week I say “Everything is perfect”

Because it is. Yeah I have no job lined up. Yeah, I have a month left on the best place on Earth. And yeah, at least a handful of people in my family are always battling some bizarre illness or cancer or something. Oh and my Dad is dead. But seriously, everything is perfect. I have the best friends this side of the world. I have the best family ever. I have my health. I have a chance to slaughter the classroom on my academic grind and then go out Thursday. Where else in the world can you get drunk 3 nights a week with your best friends, and present a thesis at an Honors Fraternity banquet at the same time? Plus, I got a girl I’ve got my eye on. Yeah I would say everything is perfect. And if i can say it, then so can you.

5. Every time I go home I visit my father’s grave

Hopefully this applies to none of you. But here is why I do it: Whenever I go there it reminds me of two things.

1. Where I’ve been. This is what I’ve been through. This is my story. Seeing that grave reminds me of the man I have become. At the same time it reminds me of the painful journey it took for me to get there. Consider it a physical reminder of how precious life is.

2. Life is so precious because we do not know the future. Seeing my dad lets me know that it is okay not to know what the future holds for us. No one does. My dad was the smartest man I knew and even he could have predicted what happened to him. That calms me down. Its reassuring to know that we are just as lost in this world as the person next to us. Our lack of predestination is an opportunity. An opportunity to take everything in stride and show everyone what we’re made of. Take advantage of uncertainty. It will bring you surprise and adventure.

Find your way to appreciate where you’ve been. Find your way to accept that you have no idea what the future has in store for you. Come to peace with that and it will do wonders for you

Lesson: Take time to realize how awesome you are. This time in our life will surely pass. Which is alright. But it is solely your responsibility to recognize how blessed you truly are. So slow down, it will open your eyes and calm your sprirt.

Yours,

                                                                                                                                                                                   PHA